how to hire a human resources manager or director.

how to hire a human resources manager or director.

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Seeking a human resources manager or director for your organization? You're not alone. Labor-insights provider Burning Glass reports that there were almost 47,000 HR manager/director positions available in the past 12 months. So how do you find the right person to lead your HR department?

Finding the perfect HR manager or director can certainly be complicated, so we've broken down the process into a few simple steps:

1. speed up your hiring process

HR managers and directors are critical positions — after all, they're responsible for your company's entire people operations. So if you need someone in the door, and fast, a lengthy recruiting timeline can be discouraging. And it can be costly, too. The lack of an HR manager/director can stall major company initiatives since they deal with current employee staffing and hiring plans. 

The hiring diagram below shows you how to make your process as efficient as possible, so you can find the perfect fit.

2. develop a competitive compensation package

To attract the type of candidate that will thrive at your company, you need to offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Someone who is seeking an HR position at the manager or director level will have a very good understanding of what a good salary and benefits package is — it's their job! So do your research on what the market is offering for similar positions, and then check out Randstad's 2019 Salary Guide for more information. Here are the average salaries for these positions based on experience level.

HR manager

entry-level
$83,510 – $101,355

mid-level
$97,524 – $118,364

senior-level
$112,911 – $137,038

HR director

entry-level
$112,213–$155,437

mid-level
$119,962–$166,171

senior-level
$128,514–$178,017

But again, since these are just averages, use our salary calculator for a more accurate estimate based on your location.

3. identify the top skills for HR managers/directors

Once you've completed research into salary, start looking at what skills are needed in order for the person in the open role to be successful. Talk to other executives and the HR team — like the VP of HR and recruiters who will be working on the new person's team — and decide on a list of skills and qualities to look for in potential candidates.

Here are common skills an HR manager/director needs in their role:

employee relations

HR management

performance management

human resources information system (HRIS)

onboarding

worker's compensation

budgeting

However, know that, in addition to the above, an HR director will also need the ability to make high-level strategic decisions, lead any change-management initiatives involving HR and keep a pulse on emerging technologies in the industry.

4. write an eye-catching job description

The job description could very well be a potential candidate's first impression of your company, and therefore plays a crucial role in the recruiting process. This is even more so when you're hiring for a position in HR. If the job posting isn't engaging with a clear view into the responsibilities and the company culture, prospective candidates will quickly move on to the next listing.

Here's what to keep top of mind as you write your next job description.

don't write like a robot
As job seekers comb through lists of open roles, they want to quickly know what a job will really be like, so filling the posting with corporate speak or language that is too specific to your organization won't help them understand the role or your company.

Instead of only listing skills and duties, provide information on what the day to day looks like and what opportunities for advancement there are. For example, you may write something like:

  • HR directors are a key role in any organization, but we rely on ours to take ownership for strategic staffing plans and have a point of view on HR strategy as a whole.

  • We deeply respect and value our HR managers. We depend upon them to foster and maintain positive relationships with employees company-wide to retain top performers.

show how this job is meaningful
Today's candidates — especially in the HR arena — are searching for ways to make an impact in the world, and since people spend so much time at work, their job can play an important part in helping them feel like they're doing something meaningful.

Show them in the job description how they will affect other people and parts of the organization. Answer questions like: How does this role interact with other departments or teams? Why do you think the role is important?

For instance, an HR manager is able to impact employee retention and happiness by guiding managers on how to nurture staff morale and satisfaction. And at the most senior level, HR directors are responsible for initiatives that impact the company as a whole, like growing or evaluating the benefits offerings and approving professional development programs.

make it easy to skim
Using bullet points and short paragraphs are great ways to give job seekers who are likely reading multiple listings per day a quick glimpse into what you are looking for. By making your job description short and to the point, yet informative, a potential candidate can decide if they think the role is a good fit.

For more help with this tricky writing process, be sure to check out our guide to writing highly effective job descriptions.

5. brush up on the latest industry trends

In the next few years, the human resources industry is anticipating a lot of growth. And in order for your organization to stay competitive when sourcing top candidates, you're going to have to stay on top of hiring trends in the industry.

Below are a few to keep in mind during your hiring process:

  • Job openings for HR managers/directors are expected to grow by nine percent by 2026.

  • Two factors are overwhelmingly driving this growth: economic expansion and a bevy of new businesses forming that will be in dire need of the skills these roles possess.

  • The most competitive candidates will have to stay up-to-date on changes to employment laws and other relevant policies and regulations.

For more information, visit our full guide to trends in the human resources industry.

6. choose your channels to find candidates 

Finding potential candidates where they're looking is key to attracting the right applicants and getting a candidate in the door quickly. Having an open HR manager or director role can be a real hindrance for the entirety of people operations at a company, so consider partnering with a staffing firm to gain access to candidates that are vetted and qualified for your specific hiring needs. And remember, HR professionals are especially savvy job seekers, so it becomes paramount to market these positions correctly.

Contact the human resources experts at Randstad if you need support finding your next great HR manager or director. Or, start browsing through the pool of quality candidates in our Find Employees portal.

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how to hire a human resources manager or director.

Posted by Michael Cirigliano on Sep 26, 2019 5:42:41 PM

Seeking a human resources manager or director for your organization? You're not alone. Labor-insights provider Burning Glass reports that there were almost 47,000 HR manager/director positions available in the past 12 months. So how do you find the right person to lead your HR department?

Finding the perfect HR manager or director can certainly be complicated, so we've broken down the process into a few simple steps:

1. speed up your hiring process

HR managers and directors are critical positions — after all, they're responsible for your company's entire people operations. So if you need someone in the door, and fast, a lengthy recruiting timeline can be discouraging. And it can be costly, too. The lack of an HR manager/director can stall major company initiatives since they deal with current employee staffing and hiring plans. 

The hiring diagram below shows you how to make your process as efficient as possible, so you can find the perfect fit.

2. develop a competitive compensation package

To attract the type of candidate that will thrive at your company, you need to offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Someone who is seeking an HR position at the manager or director level will have a very good understanding of what a good salary and benefits package is — it's their job! So do your research on what the market is offering for similar positions, and then check out Randstad's 2019 Salary Guide for more information. Here are the average salaries for these positions based on experience level.

HR manager

entry-level
$83,510 – $101,355

mid-level
$97,524 – $118,364

senior-level
$112,911 – $137,038

HR director

entry-level
$112,213–$155,437

mid-level
$119,962–$166,171

senior-level
$128,514–$178,017

But again, since these are just averages, use our salary calculator for a more accurate estimate based on your location.

3. identify the top skills for HR managers/directors

Once you've completed research into salary, start looking at what skills are needed in order for the person in the open role to be successful. Talk to other executives and the HR team — like the VP of HR and recruiters who will be working on the new person's team — and decide on a list of skills and qualities to look for in potential candidates.

Here are common skills an HR manager/director needs in their role:

employee relations

HR management

performance management

human resources information system (HRIS)

onboarding

worker's compensation

budgeting

However, know that, in addition to the above, an HR director will also need the ability to make high-level strategic decisions, lead any change-management initiatives involving HR and keep a pulse on emerging technologies in the industry.

4. write an eye-catching job description

The job description could very well be a potential candidate's first impression of your company, and therefore plays a crucial role in the recruiting process. This is even more so when you're hiring for a position in HR. If the job posting isn't engaging with a clear view into the responsibilities and the company culture, prospective candidates will quickly move on to the next listing.

Here's what to keep top of mind as you write your next job description.

don't write like a robot
As job seekers comb through lists of open roles, they want to quickly know what a job will really be like, so filling the posting with corporate speak or language that is too specific to your organization won't help them understand the role or your company.

Instead of only listing skills and duties, provide information on what the day to day looks like and what opportunities for advancement there are. For example, you may write something like:

  • HR directors are a key role in any organization, but we rely on ours to take ownership for strategic staffing plans and have a point of view on HR strategy as a whole.

  • We deeply respect and value our HR managers. We depend upon them to foster and maintain positive relationships with employees company-wide to retain top performers.

show how this job is meaningful
Today's candidates — especially in the HR arena — are searching for ways to make an impact in the world, and since people spend so much time at work, their job can play an important part in helping them feel like they're doing something meaningful.

Show them in the job description how they will affect other people and parts of the organization. Answer questions like: How does this role interact with other departments or teams? Why do you think the role is important?

For instance, an HR manager is able to impact employee retention and happiness by guiding managers on how to nurture staff morale and satisfaction. And at the most senior level, HR directors are responsible for initiatives that impact the company as a whole, like growing or evaluating the benefits offerings and approving professional development programs.

make it easy to skim
Using bullet points and short paragraphs are great ways to give job seekers who are likely reading multiple listings per day a quick glimpse into what you are looking for. By making your job description short and to the point, yet informative, a potential candidate can decide if they think the role is a good fit.

For more help with this tricky writing process, be sure to check out our guide to writing highly effective job descriptions.

5. brush up on the latest industry trends

In the next few years, the human resources industry is anticipating a lot of growth. And in order for your organization to stay competitive when sourcing top candidates, you're going to have to stay on top of hiring trends in the industry.

Below are a few to keep in mind during your hiring process:

  • Job openings for HR managers/directors are expected to grow by nine percent by 2026.

  • Two factors are overwhelmingly driving this growth: economic expansion and a bevy of new businesses forming that will be in dire need of the skills these roles possess.

  • The most competitive candidates will have to stay up-to-date on changes to employment laws and other relevant policies and regulations.

For more information, visit our full guide to trends in the human resources industry.

6. choose your channels to find candidates 

Finding potential candidates where they're looking is key to attracting the right applicants and getting a candidate in the door quickly. Having an open HR manager or director role can be a real hindrance for the entirety of people operations at a company, so consider partnering with a staffing firm to gain access to candidates that are vetted and qualified for your specific hiring needs. And remember, HR professionals are especially savvy job seekers, so it becomes paramount to market these positions correctly.

Contact the human resources experts at Randstad if you need support finding your next great HR manager or director. Or, start browsing through the pool of quality candidates in our Find Employees portal.

Topics: phase:explore, industry:human resources, topic:problems